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If you or someone you know has a felony conviction and has completed probation or supervision, you can likely be a voter. 

People with felony convictions are eligible to be voters in Minnesota when they complete their sentence and finish their probation or supervision.  

Register to vote. Eligible voters can register online or by mail before Election Day, or register in person at their polling place on Election Day with an approved form of ID and proof of residence.  

Make a voting plan. There are several ways to exercise your power this year. 

  • Vote absentee by mail 

  • Return your absentee ballot in person 

  • Vote early in person 

  • Vote in person on Election Day 

Request an absentee ballot. Request a ballot by applying online or by submitting a completed PDF form by mail, fax or email to your county election office. 

When you receive your ballot, return it right away either by mail or in person. Absentee ballots returned via mail must be postmarked by Election Day on Tuesday, Nov. 3 and received by the elections office by Nov. 10. Absentee ballots returned in person must be dropped off by Tuesday, Nov. 3 at 3 p.m. 

Voting In Person. Voters who choose to cast their ballot in person are urged to vote early at their local election office beginning on Sept. 18.  

Here’s what you need to know if you’re planning to vote in person, either early or on Election Day: 

Am I eligible to be a voter this election season? 

I was charged with or convicted of a misdemeanor or gross misdemeanor.

Q.I was charged with or convicted of a misdemeanor or gross misdemeanor.
A.

I can be a voter. 

I’m in jail, but am not currently serving a felony sentence.

Q.I’m in jail, but am not currently serving a felony sentence.
A.

I can be a voter. 

I’ve been charged with a felony, but I haven’t been convicted.

Q.I’ve been charged with a felony, but I haven’t been convicted.
A.

I can be a voter. 

I’ve been given a stay of adjudication.

Q.I’ve been given a stay of adjudication.
A.

I can be a voter. 

I finished all parts of my felony sentence in another state.

Q.I finished all parts of my felony sentence in another state.
A.

I can be a voter. 

I finished all parts of my felony sentence, including probation or parole.

Q.I finished all parts of my felony sentence, including probation or parole.
A.

I can be a voter. 

I am currently serving a felony sentence, including probation or parole.

Q.I am currently serving a felony sentence, including probation or parole.
A.

I am not yet eligible to be a voter.* 

The ACLU-MN is working hard to extend voting rights to people still on felony probation or supervision. To get involved in our work to reclaim the vote, visit https://bit.ly/3hEdRb5.  
 

My stay of adjudication was revoked and I’m currently serving a felony sentence.

Q.My stay of adjudication was revoked and I’m currently serving a felony sentence.
A.

I am not yet eligible to be a voter.* 

The ACLU-MN is working hard to extend voting rights to people still on felony probation or supervision. To get involved in our work to reclaim the vote, visit https://bit.ly/3hEdRb5.